Clean Cosmetics – How Far Have We Come?

I don’t know if I can thoroughly express the pivotal change in my life when I began learning about conventional cosmetics and the potential health implications they can have.  It was definitely an overwhelming, and scary realization that this could possibly be true.  I then set out in search of alternatives and was so fortunate to discover a few local manufacturers that could answer my questions, and in turn I could begin to trust.

My health, as I’m sure yours, is most important to me and I’m not willing to knowingly compromise it, especially when I have a choice!  It’s been said that by the time a woman heads out the front door, she has spritzed, sudsed, and slathered herself in more than 127 different chemicals, many of them more toxic than beautifying.

After the book came out “There’s Lead In Your Lipstick” by eco-expert Gillian Deacon, many women started questioning if the health conditions, including cancer were possibly related to the unimaginable amount of toxins, parabens, hormone disrupters and synthetic chemicals they had allowed  into their bodies through the use of conventional products.  We naively trust that there are regulations and systems in place to protect us but unfortunately those systems are only about regulating the “safe amounts” of the known hazardous ingredient into a specific product. As far as my research and knowledge, there has never been a study that shows the “safety” of the possible 127 chemicals taken in at one time.

Our skin is our largest organ (yes, it’s an organ!!) and it’s absorbing all that we put on it, which ends up in our blood stream! 

EWG (The Environmenal Working Group) has compiled an electronic database (the skindeep database) of ingredient labels for body care products and cross-linked these ingredients with large databases describing chemical toxicity and then rates them on the hazards.  This is a great resource when you are starting out, or expanding your knowledge on potentially harmful chemicals.  They rate the ingredients/products on a scale of is ventolin a gernarnic medicene a sample paper go site help writing college essay jack london essay see url viagra cheap cialis canadian commercial enter https://austinmusicfoundation.org/papers/critical-essay-paragraph/2020/ terminal services white paper buy canada viagra generic viagra california here buy antibiotics online without a prescription buy viagra with online prescription thesis ship design aral sea case study very painful after taking clomid http://floatinglotus.com/prescription/levitra-vision-side-effects/50/ click cheapest place to buy clomid without prescription go site sildenafil gel uk cialis half life graph http://medinahealthcare.org/generic-viagra-greece/ https://www.iama.edu/clinics/blood-pressure-and-cialis.html follow 1-2 Low Hazard, 3-6 Moderate and 7-10 High Hazard…look up fragrance and it’s an “8” score! Eliminating “fragrance” in my opinion,  is the place to start if you start anywhere!

About FRAGRANCE: The word “fragrance” or “parfum” on the product label represents an undisclosed mixture of various scent chemicals and ingredients used as fragrance dispersants such as diethyl phthalate. Fragrance mixes have been associated with allergies, dermatitis, respiratory distress and potential effects on the reproductive system.

Thankfully, we have options!  It may take some work to find them, but I see more and more companies beginning to make some changes.  It is however up to us as consumers to continue to DEMAND that our health not be compromised by the ingredients manufacturers CHOOSE to use! How? We simply don’t continue to support them!

Pure Anada Cosmetics has been my go to as a trusted source for safe cosmetics and skincare products.  They are a manufacturer in Modern, Manitoba and have been influential in setting the bar in my opinion, for transparency and proving natural cosmetics can stand up to conventional products.

Candace Grenier is the creator behind Pure Anada and has taken the company from home hobby to a leader in eco-certified organic cosmetic manufacturing in Canada!  FYI – only approximately 5% of cosmetic companies actually manufacture their own products and there appears to be some sort of trade secret protection when it comes to fragrance and flavour. Yet another reason Pure Anada became a company I chose to support and trust for the past 7 years!

Of course we’re not just talking makeup here!  The cosmetic umbrella includes shampoo, conditioner, hair styling products, toothpaste, deodorants, lotions, scrubs, face cleansers, bar soap, moisturizers, shaving cream, lip balm, nail polish, diaper cream, nipple cream, massage oils & MORE!!!

At Generation Green we know how overwhelming and confusing all the information out there can be, not to mention how “greenwashing” (FYI: those bunny ears on products only mean they didn’t test it on an animal, not that it’s safe), same goes for the words “natural” and “organic” (no regulating on those words!) BUT, WE ARE HERE TO HELP!! It’s one step at a time and one change at a time!  It started with cosmetics as my focus and grew into Generation Green over almost 7 years!  We are still learning, still growing but the more we know, the better we can make informed choices!

 

Safe Skincare

The next time your out shopping for cosmetics, turn over the bottle of either shampoo, body wash, toothpaste, etc., and read the ingredients. While it is difficult to understand, let alone pronounce a lot of those ingredients, we have to be concerned, we have to be informed, and we have to be our own health advocates.

Although things are improving on the regulating of cosmetics through Health Canada, there is still concern regarding the possible long term effects, and of the known chemicals still in cosmetics.

There is a great little video called “The Story Of Cosmetics” that was put out by the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics. While this is a US based group and the regulations and laws are also US based, there is information here that is pertinent to Canada. Primarily the fact that many cosmetic ingredients are unsustainable toxic petrochemicals, and how the use of some products together can build up toxins in our bodies, that intern effect our long term health. You can view the video here.

Canada’s system of testing and regulating cosmetics is much more advanced than that of the United States, but there is still room for improvement. Health Canada has banned or restricted over 500 chemical ingredients for use in cosmetic products. These chemicals can be found on Canada’s Cosmetic Ingredient Hotlist. Comparatively, the U.S. has banned only 8 chemical ingredients for use in cosmetics.

That all being said, on Health Canada’s website there is a notice to manufacturers if a “hotlist” chemical is found in their product;

If a cosmetic contains an ingredient which appears on the Hotlist, the manufacturer may be advised to:

Remove the ingredient from the formulation;
Reduce the concentration of the ingredient to an acceptable level;
Consider marketing the product as a non-prescription drug or natural health product, with appropriate claims and application for a Drug Identification Number (DIN) or Natural Product Number (NPN);
Provide evidence that the product is safe for its intended use;
Confirm that the product is labelled as required;
Confirm that the product is sold in a child-resistant package.
This is somewhat alarming knowing that these are chemicals that have proven health concerns and yet could still be considered to have “an acceptable level” and allowed in cosmetic products.

60% of what you put on your skin is absorbed into your bloodstream! That’s nothing to ignore. Our skin is our largest organ and we need to nourish it, not load it full of toxins!

Here’s a couple of great resources for you to use when searching for safe skincare products. EWG (Environmental Working Group) has compiled a Skindeep Database that rates products and ingredients and gives them a hazard score. You can delve deeper and find out exactly what ingredients are making a product rate as a high hazard, or even find out about the chemical or ingredient being used, and what it could potentially do to your health.

The following attachment from David Suzuki’s website, is a great little resource for ingredients best to avoid in products. Print it off and bring it along the next time your shopping for cosmetic products.

whats-inside-shoppers-guide page-0